Hercules Triumphant

In ancient Athens, Herakles was one of the deities honored on the fourth day of every month. In ancient Rome, surviving Roman calendars indicate two festivals dedicated to Hercules: April 3 to Hercules Victor and December 21 to Hercules. Roman temple dedication dates were also festival days for the Gods and several are known for Hercules: June 4 for Hercules Magnus Custos; August 12 for Hercules Invictus; and August 13 for Hercules Victor. There were many, at least 40, shrines and temples dedicated to Hercules in the city of Rome. The Great Altar, Herculis Invicti Ara Maxima, was dedicated to Hercules. A shrine might just be a sculpture or an altar rather than a building. Literary references and carved inscriptions indicate altars, monuments, or shrines to Hercules Cubans, Hercules Fundanus, Hercules Musarum, Hercules Olivarius, Hercules Pompeianus, Hercules Primagenius, Hercules Sullanus, and Hercules Triumphalis. The last named was simply a statue in the Forum Boarium. Hercules Victor possessed at least two temples under the name of Victor. Temples dedicated to Hercules were usually, if not always, small round buildings in a Greek style.

I propose a new modern cult dedicated to the Triumphant Hercules. The closest Latin version of that name appears to be Hercules Triumphalis, Hercules of the Triumph. The annual festival date shall be, at least provisionally and subject to change, March 6, which happens to be today. Today is the day of Hercules in my private liturgical calendar. This is all somewhat tentative and I do not know how it will develop.

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Published in: on March 6, 2012 at 7:39 pm  Comments (1)  
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